10 on Sunday (Dolphins Edition)

10 on Sunday (Dolphins Edition)

  • 1). As far as the first half, it was a case of if teams get healthy against bad teams, then the Browns had a spa weekend in Sedona against the Dolphins. In a battle of the resistable force meeting the movable object, the Browns porous rush defense was no match for the Dolphins even more anorexic rushing attack. Bad coaching decisions? Even Freddie would be hard pressed to produce a whopper like a fake punt UP THE MIDDLE ON 4th and long. Dolphins coach looked like Pat Shurmur, someone contemplative on the sidelines (“was this meant to be my vocation?”), or waiting for his daily torture session inside the Hanoi Hilton. He did blow up at one point with the officials, but Fox never ran it down. And the Dolphins proved the Browns aren't the only to team with a receiver who muffs a catch that turns into a jump ball for surrounding defenders. A flag is called after a productive play... typica--, but wait, it wasn’t on the Browns, but on an opponent-- one they could just... decline? And really, when’s the last time the refs pull a flag to review a play... and then the Browns get a questionable PI call?

    In the second half, it was Moose Johnson’s oft-described Lull, or The Lull since it resembled The Ohio State University’s lull the previous day as Penn State also scored 17 unanswered points. Still, Miami made like the old Browns: start to creep closer, then fold when their opponent woke up.

    2). You knew fans would be scrambling to find out when the last time the Browns had a 25+ lead at the half? Who was the President? Johnson? Kennedy? Eisenhower? Will they do a quick montage that this was the year when the average house cost $12,000 or a gallon of gas was $0.32.

    Well, Chris Myers mentioned 18 years ago, and added the Browns had not managed 28 points in a half since 1999. Maybe I misheard this since a quick check didn’t turn up the games.

    3). Mayfield seemed to follow the flow with an impressive first half, and then being part of the Lull with the behind Beckham pass that turned into the fireman’s carry for the defender INT, and then a string of not even close incompletions to follow up his 12 straight catches. Ideally, Mayfield should be the guy who shines and straps on the load when things go bad, not simply join in THE Lull.

    3). All things given, Monken and Kitchens have crafted an equitable split of responsibilities between Chubb and Hunt. No Jim Brown/Ernie Davis backfield tandem, but Hunt is used for what he at least does better than Chubb, and that’s receiving. And after Chubb’s had a longer run or one where he carries a defender along the way, a fresh Hunt is in on the next play.

    4). It’s been mentioned many times how the Browns play a lot of zone defense when both Ward and Williams forte is man to man. But what really exacerbates this is the lack of a safety over the middle. So Fitzpatrick feasted with intermediate routes where the corners had to leave their men...to the wide open spaces in the middle of the field.

    5). Dubious PI call against Greedy with 11 left in the game. Did refs feel the need for a make good for calls against Beckham? Can Beckham draw a call by the refs for excessive mugging to the cameras after a catch?

    6). I remember Phil Dawson having trouble converting FG’s at the east end of the stadium early in his career Siebert seems to have the same problem. We still have yet to see him in a critical situation or with the game on the line. Curious as to how he’ll fare. Guys like Danny Ainge and Orel Herscheiser used to be dubbed "killer choir boys." Seibert just looks like a choir boy.

    7). Chubb has a running style where he’s not hard to tackle if he hits the line slowly in traffic. But if there is a hole, and he gets up a head of steam (like the screen pass on the first play from scrimmage), he’s Earl Campbell in Emmit Smith’s body.

    But what truly sets him apart is the “not to be denied” effort when he’s within five yards of the end zone.

    8 ) What’s the psychological advantage for the Browns on a 40 degree day when they wear their heat absorbing seal brown jerseys, and standing on the sunlit north side of the stadium... while the Dolphins wear their heat reflecting white jerseys and standing in the shadows on the south side of the stadium? The only Dolphin to look comfortable was Fitzpatrick with his beard supplying more cover than Yukon Jack's fur coat.

    9). There was clearly a Quid pro quo between Landry and Mayfield. I’m figuring that if Landry had 10 or more catches against his former team, he’d supply Baker with a year’s supply of lap dances at the Crazy Horse. Sure, these guys probably hang at more gentlemanly gentlemen’s clubs with Platinum VIP rooms one door beyond the Gold room, another door past the regular VIP room, but I’m woefully ignorant on better references in this century.

    10). Not buying Chris Myers end of game exclamation that the Browns has a complete game and we’re mounting a playoff push. Still too many dumb penalties and mistakes. They had many good plays, but were helped greatly by the Dolphins inability to make plays, especially when they scored 17/ unanswered points. As Moose indicated, both teams were making the sort of mistakes they should have cleaned up by much earlier in the season. The Browns did seem to use the run and quick, short strikes to set up deeper passes. But The Lull seemed to produce a seemingly ineffective prevent defense and then incompletions that couldn't keep the offense on the field. Fortunately the part of getting healthy included the bonus of the Dolphins negating the huge turnaround play with a waaaay-too-hard pass leading to an INT and huge return.

    So let’s not take the game as anything more than the Browns getting healthy against a beleaguered team. They’ll look more impressive next week if they do the same against another beleaguered team hell bent on revenge.

    This post was edited by Vaark 1 month ago

  • Discussion
  • Vaark - "And when’s the last time the refs pull a flag to review a play... and then the Browns get a questionable PI call?"

    Have to admit I was shocked when the New York stooges initiated a booth review for the no-PI call late in the 1st half on OBJ. Was it PI??....maybe.....but, it certainly wasn't blatant enough to warrant a booth review....particularly, in light of all the blatant ones that they've refused to overturn over the past few weeks.

    Miami must be deeper in the league's doghouse than we are.

    Al Riveron really needs to go....he's been in over his head since the day they gave him the job. He's inconsistent and doesn't seem to have a lick of common sense or feel for the game.

    Maybe he was trying to make up for the Raiders game last year that he stole from us.....if so, he shoulda saved it for a game where we really needed a break.


  • AA
    3). Mayfield seemed to follow the flow with an impressive first half, and then being part of the Lull with the behind Beckham pass that turned into the fireman’s carry for the defender INT.

    H
    Agree. You could see Bakers confidence when trusting his targets. It is amazing to think on one team you have OBJ, Jarvis, Chubb & Hunt. With this many targets you shouldn't miss. With it looking better I'll reserve in saying to much about the 'lull'. I'll take the win and give Freddie more leeway for now. If they get Hunt in step with Chubb this will be the best running Tandem in for us in years as well any in the NFL for sometime. We need to do better stepping on the neck of our opponents when having them down. With what we did in the first have we should have to be nervous in the second. I'm surprised there isn't a LOT more love for Schobert. He isn't flashy but he always seems to be in the right place and makes critical plays. I love the guy. Good old fashion 'football player'.

    I guess had we walked away with it, we risked going into next weeks game cocky and a possible let down. We showed enough for the confidence building and hopefully reminded what will happen if we let down just a little.

    This post was edited by hamster 1 month ago

  • 11. They need to stop targeting Harris. Give me Seals-Jones or Carlson, since both of those guys actually possess hands while Harris is trying to catch with two frying pans.

    This post was edited by Gameface64 1 month ago

  • So let’s not take the game as anything more than the Browns getting healthy against a beleaguered team.

    Agree. The Browns took care of business, but there were still too many errors, like Mack's helmet-to-helmet hit on what should have been a 4th-and-9 but gave Miami a first down. They went on to score the second TD to make it a 28-17 game with plenty of time left.

    What Browns fans wasn't wondering if the Browns were really going to find a way to blow a 28-0 lead at home to the second worst team in football?

    But they didn't.

    Lots of great performances. Landry had 10 catches in 11 targets for 148 yards and 2 TD's; probably his best game as a Brown. Chubb had 164 yards from scrimmage. The offense had 467 yards at 7.0 per play. The defense held Fitz to 214 yards on 39 pass attempts, sacked him four times and intercepted twice. They also held the Dolphin running backs to 47 yards on 15 carries.

    Mayfield threw with velocity, timing, and accuracy. The only quibble I have is with those slant patterns, which I've posted about before. When you're drilling a hard pass on a short crossing route it's so easy for the ball to bounce off the receiver's hands if the location isn't perfect. The disastrous Callaway interception was on a slant. So was another huge pick, against Denver, I think. Today Baker had two slants intercepted. The first one totally reversed the momentum of the game and led to 17 unanswered points. The second one was called back due to an illegal hit so Baker only got charged with one, but he threw two. To be fair, he also completed a few, but he needs to get more consistent on the location of those balls.

    Great to see OBJ finally get another TD after eight games without one. Not to mention six catches for 84 yards. I'll take that every week.

    I didn't see any injuries so if we get past the Dolphins with a W and no injuries that's all we can ask.

    On to the Steelers in Pittsburgh. We get Ogunjobi back and maybe Vernon and Njoku. The Steelers struggled to beat the Bengals, which is encouraging I guess.

    This post was edited by PROSECUTOR 1 month ago

  • From PFF:

    "Granted he was facing a young, rebuilding Miami offensive line, Brian Cox Jr. rose to the occasion. Cox beat the Dolphins’ tackles to the outside all afternoon and could find a consistent role with Cleveland while Garrett is out."

    So far, so good.

    Still too many dumb penalties. Two penalties for an ineligible receiver downfield. OK, if it's a pass play, don't run past the LOS if you're an offensive lineman. How difficult is that?

    They also had to burn a timeout AFTER a penalty. Baker threw a pass and an offensive linemen was penalized for being downfield (see above). That gave the Browns extra time to get the play in while the penalty was being stepped off. There was some confusion getting lined up and Baker had to waste a time out to avoid a delay of game penalty. I hate when that happens. You get extra time due to the penalty and you still have to blow a time out. Do the Patriots ever do that? I doubt it, but the Browns do.

  • The lull, which Moose prognosticated, seemed, to me, to stem from the offense going away from the run and into more shotgun read-option formations.

    Iirc, the busted gadget play, where they nearly fumbled the ball away, also occurred at the beginning of the lull.

    Freddie seems hell bent on using these shotgun read-option schemes that are clearly not efficient/effective.

    I just don’t see why it’s so hard to see that the runs set up the pass- and I’m talking big play passes: look at the 49ers tonight- they run the hell out of the ball and use 3 tight ends to set up play action bombs to Kittle slipping out of the pa blocking for long gains. Deebo Samuel also got loose on a play action bomb.

    Apparently LaFleur didn’t watch the Browns/niners tape, because he tried to spread out the niners and left Bosa 1/1 against his tackles and Rodgers got destroyed. Apparently he totally ignored the Seahawks/niners tape and the formula which kept Carroll and the Hawks in the game and ultimately gave them a win.

    The formula is simple, Freddie. The run game sets up the pass. Play action makes the defense respect the run and opens up the deep pass game. The read option bs is just that- the air raid may work in college but in the pros it’s Shiite. Figure it out- sooner rather than later. You don’t play the fish every week.

    KISS

    This post was edited by dawgmusic 1 month ago

  • I'm still confused over the last time the Browns scored 28 points in a half, started a game with a 28-0 lead, or had a 25 point lead at halftime.

    Chris Myers came back at the start of the second half to mention something about the largest half time lead (maybe not 25+ points) in 18 years. And then he said (I think) the Browns had not scored 28 points in a half since... 1999? But he didn't cite specific games, and I sure didn't find anything after the game or this morning. Hell, CBS not only would have cited the game, they would have had footage of it with the old graphics. Fox can only make a mention, and it appears to be one they'd hope no one was verifying.

    Did a local beat writer mention this as a bullet point near the bottom of their coverage?

  • Vaark said... (original post) I'm still confused over the last time the Browns scored 28 points in a half, started a game with a 28-0 lead, or had a 25 point lead at halftime...

    One positive thing about the offense this year is they've been getting off to good starts. They come in with rehearsed plays for their opening drive and execute them well. Then it all goes to hell, which doesn't speak well for Freddie. It was great to see the Browns score four offensive TD's in the first half, but it was against a very bad defense. This week they get the #3 rated defense in football. Last game they scored 21 on them. That should be enough this week if they can do it.

  • dawgmusic said... (original post) The lull, which Moose prognosticated, seemed, to me, to stem from the offense going away from the run and into more shotgun read-option formation...

    "The formula is simple, Freddie. The run game sets up the pass. Play action makes the defense respect the run and opens up the deep pass game. The read option bs is just that- the air raid may work in college but in the pros it’s Shiite. Figure it out- sooner rather than later. You don’t play the fish every week."

    -- This is more true than ever now that Hunt has joined the party. I think the O under Freddie has been slow in figuring out how best to use the several weapons it has with a semi-rookie QB at the helm. Especially with a new shiny object named OBJ. Now the O has the Kareem toy as well. But he's come along as Freddie is perhaps slowly getting a little better at learning how to drive his new car. (He still needs to get better at handling the kids in the back-seat, though. Remember, Freddie, they aren't supposed to hit...)

    If The Lull really exists, it certainly is no credit to the ability of the Fredken Twins if they are losing the adjustment war at the half. What I think we've seen this year is talent being under-utilized as Freddie learns to be a HC his first time out. He seems to be doing better lately. But the question is: Was it a wise move by Dorsey to make it happen in the first place when he had other options to go with? However, it may all turn out fine next year and once again we can chant: In Dorsey we Trust!

  • PROSECUTOR said... (original post) One positive thing about the offense this year is they've been getting off to good starts. They come in with rehearsed plays for their open...

    I've said it in the past and say it again. Freddie's biggest weakness is being able to adjust game day.

  • dawgmusic said... (original post) The lull, which Moose prognosticated, seemed, to me, to stem from the offense going away from the run and into more shotgun read-option formation...

    Speaking of Matt LaFleur, one target for Aaron Jones. Ran him repeatedly up the middle where he was swallowed by the Niner D. He continues to alternate Jones and Jamal Williams each series. Williams had multiple catches in the screen game. Williams is the better inside runner, Jones is better in space. LaFleur did the opposite.

    Makes Fred look like a member of Football MENSA.

  • hamster said... (original post) I've said it in the past and say it again. Freddie's biggest weakness is being able to adjust game day.

    I don't think Wilks is an ace at it either. I can't figure that man out. Some of his game plans are pure gold (Rams, Bills, Ravens, Steelers), and some seem conceived by a drunk (Broncos, 49ers, Seahawks).

  • "Dolphins coach looked like Pat Shurmur, someone contemplative on the sidelines (“was this meant to be my vocation?”), or waiting for his daily torture session inside the Hanoi Hilton."

    You're coming back with a nicely thrown longball after your lull last week when we really needed you.
    Better get geared up for next week, boyo.

    I'm already starting with Ref Rage exercises. I've got a brick made of foam called "Bad Call Brick" that Professor Richard Drexler of the Music Department at the University of Central Florida gave me the day after bottlegate. He doesn't watch football - ever - at all - and even he knew we got jobbed that day. I expect nothing less this coming weekend as we get called for offensive pass interference 9 times with pieces of Beckham strewn across the field while Joey Porter's mom chews kittens on the she-ler sideline.

  • Gameface64 said... (original post) I don't think Wilks is an ace at it either. I can't figure that man out. Some of his game plans are pure gold (Rams, Bills, Ravens, St...

    Agree on this too. Wilks has been an incredible disapointment when it comes to consistancy and adjustments. Of course this adds more to Freddie's inablitiy. As Freddie's new role, the defense also falls on him now. So has he contributred to the defense? Can he contribute to it? Does he hold it (& Wilks) accountible? Is this another learning curve we need to be patient with?

    This post was edited by hamster 1 month ago

  • GF:

    11. They need to stop targeting Harris. Give me Seals-Jones or Carlson, since both of those guys actually possess hands while Harris is trying to catch with two frying pans.

    AA:

    Harris has improved from a very rocky September where not only did he try to catch with two frying pans, but they also had the no-stick finish. Seal-Jones looks like the Brent Perriman of TE's in that he can make plays, but they're painfully few and far between. Carlson's td catch was a revelation when he reached over a defender to make the grab. Curious to see how he fares through the rest of the season. I think he has potential to stay on the roster longer than the others. I think Njoku will only last on the roster if Dorsey lacks the opportunity to sign a proven FA or can land a TE in the first two rounds.

    PROS:

    Mayfield threw with velocity, timing, and accuracy. The only quibble I have is with those slant patterns, which I've posted about before.

    AA:

    Between Fitzpatrick and Mayfield, there were about 278 slant passes attempted yesterday (rough estimate). The difference was that the Dolphins completions were deeper, and the receivers side open. Browns were quicker, shallower and in much tighter windows. The second INT that was nullified had Baker fire one that even Derek Anderson would have remarked "Dude, wtf?!!" Not even Beckham could have handled that pill.

    I miss the days when Mayfield had some time and threw to a wide open target who could then get yac. Now he's moving the chains, but those slants put fans on edge. To say he's "trusting his receivers" would be an understatement. He threw some dicey balls, and yet Landry and Beckham earned their keep. Poor Higgins. He was even more wide open than OBJ on that TD pass, and the TD pass attempt to him in the fourth quarter was deflected by the defender. Rashard's dream of feasting on 3rd best corners has died a slow death.

    DAWG:

    The lull, which Moose prognosticated, seemed, to me, to stem from the offense going away from the run and into more shotgun read-option formations.

    Iirc, the busted gadget play, where they nearly fumbled the ball away, also occurred at the beginning of the lull.

    AA:

    I think that was where Hunt fumbled with 2:31 left in the half, and the Browns ended up scoring to go up 28-0.

    DAWG:

    Freddie seems hell bent on using these shotgun read-option schemes that are clearly not efficient/effective.

    AA:

    The Browns do seem to be snakebit on the gadget plays this year. I'm expecting Baker to get the snap under center, do that little toss in the air back to himself as he's dropping back, and it gets intercepted by a blitzing interior LB.

    But no one can accuse the Browns of underutilizing Chubb. He now leads the NFL with most carries, even though the Browns are in the middle of the pack with most carries. Hunt can do a lot to take some wear and tear off Chubb and give them an added dimension to the outside. I think Freddie is coming around to the idea that this club runs to set up the pass, and short, quick passes to set up long ones.

    ERGO:

    If The Lull really exists, it certainly is no credit to the ability of the Fredken Twins if they are losing the adjustment war at the half.

    AA:

    "We lost the adjustment war, we lost it until you came to Casablanca. We got it back last night." Oops, that was Freddie Kitchens channeling Rick Blaine.

    Did they lose it at the half, but got it back at the end of the third quarter when they went 64 yards in nearly four minutes to kick a FG?

    Only if we ignore the two Dolphin PI calls.

    ERGO:

    What I think we've seen this year is talent being under-utilized as Freddie learns to be a HC his first time out. He seems to be doing better lately. But the question is: Was it a wise move by Dorsey to make it happen in the first place when he had other options to go with?

    AA:

    This has been covered ad nauseum. I don't know that Dorsey had that many other options. Riley wasn't budging, and Arians didn't suit him. There were 2-3 others, if that. Dorsey tapped Freddie out of fear of losing the OC who revived Mayfield, and it was ALL about keeping the top draft pick happy.

    But what we get out of it was a big **** hump of a learning curve, and right now it's still up in the air where there's light at the end of the tunnel, or the optometrist is telling us it's just a floater.

    Or maybe, as the Chinese patient said, it's either a cataract... or a Rincoln Continentar.

  • Vaark said... (original post) GF:11. They need to stop targeting Harris. Give me Seals-Jones or Carlson, since both of those guys actually possess hands while Harris is trying to ...

    AA:
    "This has been covered ad nauseum. I don't know that Dorsey had that many other options. Riley wasn't budging, and Arians didn't suit him. There were 2-3 others, if that. Dorsey tapped Freddie out of fear of losing the OC who revived Mayfield, and it was ALL about keeping the top draft pick happy."

    -- Well, it is a nauseating topic, I'll grant that. Yes, he did in fact have the Arians Option. You say it "didn't suit him". Apparently not. But that's not the issue. Why didn't it "suit him"? Isn't it the GM's job to craft the team in the best way possible? Even if some of it "doesn't suit him" for some reason? Fear of losing Baker's buddy? Arians clearly said he would keep Freddie as his OC. Other than groundless fears, I know of no dependable source who has stated that other teams coveted Freddie as HC. I think it was more a fear by Dorsey of impacting his overall control of the team if he hired a capable and experienced HC instead of a career position coach who was just real, real grateful for the opportunity Mr. Dorsey, sir.

    At any rate, it may all turn out okay. I will kowtow to the Dorsey Effigy when it does.

    So as ad nauseum as the past history may be, what is still relevant is the capability of our GM to handle the team as it progresses.

  • ERGO:

    -- Well, it is a nauseating topic, I'll grant that. Yes, he did in fact have the Arians Option. You say it "didn't suit him". Apparently not. But that's not the issue.

    AA:

    It IS the issue, at least for the purposes of this discussion, namely was Dorsey's hire a wise move "when he had other options to go with?" Doesn't sound like there were many other options.

    I don't know why Arians didn't suit Dorsey, which seemed pretty clear given Bruce was not extended even the time of day (or as the harried businessman said over the phone "No, Tuesday's out. How about never? Does never work for you?"). People have been more than willing to assign their reasons for that, mostly along the lines of Dorsey not wanting an ego with whom he would have to joust.

    Maybe.

    Maybe he didn't care for Arians iffy health.

    Maybe he didn't care for his offensive philosophies.

    Maybe he thought Bruce's jaunty chapeaus were seriously overrated.

    Maybe Freddie figured Bruce would cramp his offensive style.

    Maybe Freddie believed that as a gambit to get Dorsey to throw up his hands and just hire him as the HMFIC.

    Ya gotta figure that GM's are hip to the mission statement of crafting a team in the best way possible. But fans figure that just means following their own pet ideas, like signing Trent Williams or Gerald McCoy or Braxton Miller.

    I think the issue for Dorsey in hiring coaches isn't their experience threatening his ego, but these candidates having similar preferences for players. Dorsey knows what type of players he wants drafted, and he wants coaches whose schemes fit them.

    Failing that (and maybe not the right time for the Packers' ex-HC to be available), and a genuine--if ultimately unfounded-- fear of rival suitors, Dorsey went ahead and hired Kitchens, believing the two had similar player likes, or that Kitchens would shape his coaching around Dorsey's preferences.

    This post was edited by Vaark 1 month ago

  • Vaark said... (original post) ERGO:-- Well, it is a nauseating topic, I'll grant that. Yes, he did in fact have the Arians Option. You say it "didn't suit him"...

    "Dorsey went ahead and hired Kitchens, believing the two had similar player likes, or that Kitchens would shape his coaching around Dorsey's preferences."

    -- I can't imagine on what evidence Dorsey would have been making a judgment on Freddie's "player likes". Up to then, Freddie's "likes" would have been whatever the HC or GM he was working for liked to give him. So that leaves us with "Kitchens would shape his coaching around Dorsey's preferences". On that one I can believe. A Cinderella kid who was suddenly made into a HC would be very obliging to his creator.

    There's good and bad in that. When the GM and the HC are on the same page, they can work well together. That's often good. The bad, of course, is if the GM in no way wants any dissenting opinion that may impact his sway and ability to make the team in his own image. If he reaches too far down, he may grab a handful of mud that can't be molded into a HC. He might turn out to be a Nick Chubb. Or an Austin Corbett...

    We shall see about all of that, of course. And the evidence from that will be part of judging Dorsey's ability to be a competent GM for the long-term.

  • ERGO:

    I can't imagine on what evidence Dorsey would have been making a judgment on Freddie's "player likes".

    AA:

    They're called interviews.

    And position coaches or coordinators have to scheme with what they're given, but not a one hasn't thought "if I was in charge, I'd get rid of Smith and Jones and use Bzyfysk and Bestertester."

    ERGO:

    So that leaves us with "Kitchens would shape his coaching around Dorsey's preferences". On that one I can believe.

    AA:

    Yep, ambition will do that to a coach. And there's always the possibility that Freddie and John are a match on CoachMatch.com.

    ERGO:

    The bad, of course, is if the GM in no way wants any dissenting opinion that may impact his sway and ability to make the team in his own image.

    AA:

    Well, yea, we can ascribe any number of behavioral ticks to a GM that are counter-productive, like opting for players whose sir names start with "B"). But our good friends, the Steelers and Ravens, have gone decades where GM's hired HC's who were not the tempermental interior decorators who came in and said "This is ALL wrong!! I won't stand for these smaller, fast de's on the edge. Everybody has to be 300 lbs, or they're gone!!" They hired coaches who were deemed fit for the players and style of play they wanted.

    Look at Ozzie Newsome. His entire tenure consisted of two HC's. Both Billick and Harbaugh were rookie HC's. No previous HC experience even on the college level. Did fans view that as Ozzie protecting his ego by hiring "yes" men?

    Dorsey did step over Hue by trading Hyde to get Chubb playing time. But it didn't take long for the coaches to put Corbett back on the bench, and Dorsey's ego wasn't so large that he couldn't swallow that pill, or Callaway and Avery not growing up.

    ERGO:

    We shall see about all of that, of course. And the evidence from that will be part of judging Dorsey's ability to be a competent GM for the long-term.

    AA:

    And part of that ability is to straddle the razor thin line of fan expectations.

    Will fans be happy if both Monken and Wilks are retained? If Freddie insists that he should continue calling plays? Or is that a flaw like Phil Savage who still wanted to play scout at the expense of his administrative duties?

  • ProFootballFocus grades for the Dolphins game. I grouped them in tiers and didn't include the guys who only played a few snaps. I also rounded off the numbers.

    Offense

    Mayfield, Landry: 89

    Bitonio, Chubb: 81-83

    Robinson, Beckham: 67-70

    Hubbard, Hunt: 61-64

    Seals-Jones, Carlson: 57-60

    The lowest grades went to Teller (53), Higgins (51), and Tretter (49). Tretter had a very good pass blocking grade but was very bad in run blocking.

    Great to see Baker back on track. Bitonio and Chubb were right at the top as usual. The tight ends, right guard, and right tackle were the problem areas, as usual. Nothing different than what we normally see except for Tretter having a rare bad game. He just got a nice contract extension, too. I can't remember seeing a good grade from a tight end all year, or a right guard or right tackle for that matter. With Robinson hitting free agency after this season there is a lot of work for Dorsey to do on the offensive line. At tight end we seem to have quantity but not too much quality.

    Defense

    Chad Thomas 89.9

    Thomas got the highest grade on the team and showed a huge improvement over the last four games when he graded out between 38-51. This game came out of nowhere. After getting 21 snaps or fewer the first eight games Thomas got between 43-54 snaps the last three weeks. Maybe the increased reps is helping him find his groove. With Vernon out Thomas is getting an opportunity and starting to show that maybe he has a future here, unlike others in his draft class like Avery, Callaway, and Corbett.

    Schobert 85.3.

    Richardson, Ward: 77-81

    Randall, Carrie: 69

    Greedy, Burris: 59-61

    Wilson 42

    PFF hates Mack Wilson. His season average grade is 43.3. They really hate his run defense and pass coverage, but like his tackling and pass rushing. His run defense has been better the last two weeks.

    As for the new defensive linemen who got thrown in, none of them played a lot of snaps. The highest grade went to Brandin Bryant (68). They liked his run defense. The others were all between 58-63 - just OK. But Richardson and Thomas played so well that the others being just OK was good enough, especially with the great game by Schobert and solid performances across the secondary with Ward playing well above average.

  • Vaark said... (original post) ERGO:-- Well, it is a nauseating topic, I'll grant that. Yes, he did in fact have the Arians Option. You say it "didn't suit him"...

    I don't think you can use Arian's health as an excuse when in fact Freddie almost died on the field in Arizona with a much more serious heart issue that he is still dealing with today. (I believe it was a torn heart valve)

  • Vaark said... (original post) I'm still confused over the last time the Browns scored 28 points in a half, started a game with a 28-0 lead, or had a 25 point lead at halftime...

    I’m surprised that nobody remembers we were up 28-0 at the half of the first Bungles game last year.

  • Vaark said... (original post) ERGO:I can't imagine on what evidence Dorsey would have been making a judgment on Freddie's "player likes". AA:They're calle...

    "Me: I can't imagine on what evidence Dorsey would have been making a judgment on Freddie's "player likes".
    AA:
    They're called interviews."

    -- No. I said "evidence". As in: A track record of what you have done. Not "interview". Which is words of what you say you will do. Words generally calculated to sound pleasing to the person interviewing you.

    Example: "Thanks Mr. Smith for applying for the CEO job. Your resume shows a track record of simply being a career assembly-line worker with no experience in managing a business. But by golly I sure did like how you sounded at the interview! (And those fancy-pants MBAs and experienced executives who applied for the job might get in my way.) So I'm hiring you. Your first act is to nod in agreement with everything I say while getting me some coffee."

    But perhaps Mr. Smith- just like Freddie- will prove to be good at his job.

    "Look at Ozzie Newsome. His entire tenure consisted of two HC's. Both Billick and Harbaugh were rookie HC's. No previous HC experience even on the college level. Did fans view that as Ozzie protecting his ego by hiring "yes" men?"

    -- Well, they say it's a copy-cat league. So John Dorsey is our Ozzie Newsome and Freddie Kitchens is our Harbaugh. Can't wait for the Big Reveal... Again, this may all turn out fine. Dorsey isn't the worst GM. And Freddie isn't the worst rookie HC. Probably...

    At this point, I must admit to a bit of doubt, however. Although he made a nice splash at the beginning, how Dorsey handles the team in the long-term is what matters.

  • mythrand said... (original post) I don't think you can use Arian's health as an excuse when in fact Freddie almost died on the field in Arizona with a much more serious ...

    Sure you can- if you want to when you're in charge and are riding high for the moment. Pick the facts that fit your narrative and ignore the ones that don't.

  • "Me: I can't imagine on what evidence Dorsey would have been making a judgment on Freddie's "player likes".
    AA:
    They're called interviews."

    -- No. I said "evidence". As in: A track record of what you have done. Not "interview". Which is words of what you say you will do. Words generally calculated to sound pleasing to the person interviewing you.

    AA:

    As said, a position coach doesn't get a choice of preferred players. A coordinator may have some say.

    But this was for the position of HC. So that's how a GM determines the schemes and preferences for a rookie HC. He gives orders, not take them.

    Example: "Mr. Smith, you'd be in charge of running the team. So how would you do that? What type of offense and defense would you want? Give me an idea of coordinators YOU admire. Tell me the types of scemes YOU favor. Tell me what players would fit what YOU want to do?"

    Now certainly a HC candidate can fudge it a bit to win a job, but that can always come back to haunt him when he can't properly utilize a player both of them-- or rather just one of them-- agreed would fit the bill.

    They don't have to agree on every last pick or signing, but they have to be in general agreement in overall philosophies and the talent needed to execute it....

    ... until the owner tells the GM to pick the short QB with a drinking problem.

    Wait, that could be Mayfield as well. Okay, maybe he had an sobering epiphany when he was chased down from behind by a cop.

    ERGO:

    At this point, I must admit to a bit of doubt

    AA:

    Admit it? You've been banging on dualing drums of doubt for a long while: Dorsey's ego unwilling to take on an experienced HC who could challenge him, and the ever looming threat of Haslam sticking his nose back into the football operations side o' things. Never mind that his visibility has taken on Howard Hughes proportions. He COULD come back any day now!